OVEC Event Calendar – List Format

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    Community Organizing 101: Marlinton

    Community Organizing 101
    Make your campaign or community project more effective with full-day of skill building at a Community Organizing 101 Workshop.  Learn to bring people together to make changes in your community – from passing a piece of legislation; to convincing your school board; to creating a community garden supported by city council – it’s all about organizing folks.  There’s no charge & lunch is included!

    4/8  Princeton Register here
    4/23  Marlinton Register here
    5/12  New Martinsville Register here
    5/20 Oak Hill Register here
    6/13 Charleston Register here
    6/24 Naomi  (tentative)

    Click event title for a venue map

    Deadline to Comment on Mountaineer Xpress Pipeline DEIS

    FERC (the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission) has issued the DEIS (draft environmental impact statement) on MXP. See FERC’s information on this here

    Download the DEIS at these links: 

    Hard copies of the DEIS are supposed to be available in public libraries in impacted counties. We have verified that the DEIS is available in the Central City library near the OVEC office; we also have a copy in our office. Here’s more info on the DEIS.

    Comments may also be submitted to FERC in writing until April 24, using this link. You will need the docket numbers for the project. These are: CP16-357-000 (MXP) and CP16-361-000(Gulf Xpress). 

    Talking Points on the MX Pipeline DEIS You Can Use to Make Your Own Comments

    20th Treehuggers’ Ball & 30th Birthday Bash: Birthday Bash Weekend!

    Starting at 6 p.m. on April 28, OVEC will celebrate our 20th Treehuggers’ Ball and our 30th anniversary in one big bash at the V Club in Huntington, WV.  Join the event on Facebook and event your friends here. The V Club is located at 741 6th Ave, Huntington, WV, 25701. Cover charge $15; $10 for students and seniors.

    The nationally traveling, Cincinnati-based trash-grass unit, Rumpke Mountain Boys, will headline the evening.

    Join us from 6-9 p.m. for a party on the patio, with some good grub and a birthday cake. (There will be no smoking on the patio during these hours.) Music will include Karen Scalf, Dos-3-Guise, and Shayar. Of course, THB/BB will include our legendary silent auction.

     

    Post- 9 p.m. acts will include Moonshine Crossing, Restless Leg String Band, and, the headliners, Rumpke Mountain Boys. Update: The Restless Leg String Band had to drop off the bill, but we are fortunate to have the Karpet Dabs appearing. 

    Make it a weekend in Huntington, to help us celebrate our 30th: Treehuggers’ Ball and Birthday Bash on the 28th, People’s Climate March Sister March in Huntington on the 29th and a bird watching walk on the 30th.  Details: 

    OVEC’s 30th Birthday Bash Weekend

    Sages know you have to take time to rest and play:

    There is a pervasive form of contemporary violence to which the idealist most easily succumbs: activism and overwork. The rush and pressure of modern life are a form, perhaps the most common form, of its innate violence. To allow oneself to be carried away by a multitude of conflicting concerns, to surrender to too many demands, to commit oneself to too many projects, to want to help everyone in everything, is to succumb to violence. The frenzy of our activism neutralizes our work for peace. It destroys our own inner capacity for peace. It destroys the fruitfulness of our own work, because it kills the root of inner wisdom which makes work fruitful.
                ― Thomas MertonConjectures of a Guilty Bystander 

    People’s Climate Movement March in Washington, D.C.

    From the website for the People’s Climate Movement

    A historic movement is growing to confront Donald Trump’s unprecedented attacks on people and the planet.

    The day after the inauguration, millions of people hit the streets in what has been called the largest mobilization in US history. 

    When Trump signed an executive order reviving the Keystone and Dakota Access pipelines, thousands of people rallied in D.C., Los Angeles, Chicago, New York and many other cities across the country within hours.

    Continuing to mobilize is how we rebuild political momentum for climate action and stand up against bigotry and injustice.

    On April 29, the People’s Climate Mobilization is our chance to rise up against every part of Trump’s vicious fossil fuel agenda and show the strength and determination of our opposition. Sign up now to find out more and continue building this epic wave of action.

    The first 100 days are when Presidents have the most power and legitimacy to pursue their agendas. The People’s Climate Mobilization will include rolling actions during those 100 days, leading to a major demonstration on April 29th in Washington DC and around the country.

    The Trump Administration wants to shock us into despair and inaction: that’s why he started with pushing Keystone XL and Dakota Access in his first week, along with trying to expunge all references to climate change from government websites and social media. He’s also inaugurated attacks on women’s health and dignity, and today he’s attacking immigrants and refugees.

    The People’s Climate Mobilization is our next chance to show our determination and unity, and transform it into real political power. Sign up for the People’s Climate Mobilization and you’ll get regular announcements about things you can do as a part of this resistance.

    The Trump Administration will not be able to keep its promises to their fossil fuel industry backers. Clean, 100% renewable energy is on the rise across the country. We will continue our unshakable opposition on the ground, and in the courts — every pipeline, every coal mine, every time.

    Continuing to act is how we keep hope alive. At this dangerous time, there is nothing we need more than hope, so that we may forge a new future that provides justice and dignity for us all.

    We will get there — together. 

    Huntington’s Sister Peoples Climate March and Rally

    Update: See our blog on this event here and our media advisory here

    Join us on Saturday, April 29, for the Peoples Climate March Sister March, right here in Huntington, starting at 11 a.m. at Heritage Station. Join the event on Facebook here, and be sure to invite your friends. No need to hightail it to D.C. to show your love for Mama Earth and everyone who lives here. Let’s work together to draw a crowd! 

    We’ll have a rousing rally with speakers and music, then a march around downtown Huntington in a visible show of support for climate and environmental protections–for our city, state, region, nation, and the planet we all call home.

    You’ll have a chance to find out more about oil and gas threats to the Ohio River watershed, which could prevent us from reaching our climate goals, and may endanger the tap water sources for millions of people. You’ll also have the chance to meet up with folks who are working to fight back, and to create a better future for our area! 

    This event is part of OVEC’s 30th Birthday Bash Weekend. Details here: OVEC’s 30th Birthday Bash Weekend

    PCMhton

    Birthday Bash Weekend: Bird Watching Hike at Greenbottom with Experienced Guides

    Green Bottom WMA. Photo by Janet Keating.

    As part of OVEC’s 30th Birthday Bash Weekend, spend a memorable morning at Green Bottom Wildlife Management Area, one of the most popular birding areas in West Virginia, with two experienced Huntington-area birders—Michael Griffith and Janet Keating.

    Sign up early, as we only have room for 4 more people (two slots are already taken). E-mail info@ohvec.org right away if you want to join the walk. The spring migration will be in full tilt, so it should be a great time to go birding.

    Janet and Mike will meet you at the DNR office at Green Bottom WMA at 7:00 a.m. on Sunday, April 30. Green Bottom WMA is 18 miles north of Huntington; access via state Route 2. We’ll be out birding until about noon.

    You’ll need your own binoculars. We may tromp through wet areas, so wear appropriate shoes or boots. You may want to bring a snack and a container of water. Note that there are no bathrooms, so you may have to stalk the wild asparagus if the call of the wild sounds. 

    Janet is OVEC’s retired executive director and Mike is a biologist/naturalist. Each has more than 30 years of experience birding. They will help you stalk and identify migrating and resident bird species in this unique wetlands. Stretching along the banks of the Ohio River, this wildlife management area is a network of agricultural lands, forestlands, wetlands, and open water. More than 100 species of birds may be seen each year in these wetlands and along the river bottom.

    This is a unique opportunity to observe and learn about all the many species of birds that migrate through and/or breed in West Virginia. You may be surprised; birds are where you find them. You may see shorebirds, waterfowl, flycatchers, sparrows, orioles, herons, tree swallows, vireos, prothonotary and other warblers and, birds of prey like red-tailed hawk, osprey, bald eagles and more! 

    Talking Settlements: What do the recent water settlements mean for you?

    A note from Advocates for a Safe Water System:

     

    The 2014 water crisis led to a class action lawsuit and an investigation of West Virginia American Water by the Public Service Commission. Both cases have recently settled.

    Hear from attorneys and members of Advocates for a Safe Water System to find out what the settlements mean for you. What sort of claims can you make, and how? What is the water company required to do to make our water system safer? How can we hold them accountable?

    Tuesday, May 2nd
    6:00-8:00pm
    University of Charleston, Appalachian Room (in the Geary Student Union – see campus map)
    RSVP on Facebook here.

    Hope to see you there!

    Click event title for a venue map

    Community Organizing 101: New Martinsville

    Community Organizing 101
    Make your campaign or community project more effective with full-day of skill building at a Community Organizing 101 Workshop.  Learn to bring people together to make changes in your community – from passing a piece of legislation; to convincing your school board; to creating a community garden supported by city council – it’s all about organizing folks.  There’s no charge & lunch is included!

    4/8  Princeton Register here
    4/23  Marlinton Register here
    5/12  New Martinsville Register here
    5/20 Oak Hill Register here
    6/13 Charleston Register here
    6/24 Naomi  (tentative)

    Click event title for a venue map

    Community Organizing 101: Charleston

    Community Organizing 101
    Make your campaign or community project more effective with full-day of skill building at a Community Organizing 101 Workshop.  Learn to bring people together to make changes in your community – from passing a piece of legislation; to convincing your school board; to creating a community garden supported by city council – it’s all about organizing folks.  There’s no charge & lunch is included!

    4/8  Princeton Register here
    4/23  Marlinton Register here
    5/12  New Martinsville Register here
    5/20 Oak Hill Register here
    6/13 Charleston Register here
    6/24 Naomi  (tentative)

    Click event title for a venue map

    Community Organizing 101: Oak Hill

    Community Organizing 101
    Make your campaign or community project more effective with full-day of skill building at a Community Organizing 101 Workshop.  Learn to bring people together to make changes in your community – from passing a piece of legislation; to convincing your school board; to creating a community garden supported by city council – it’s all about organizing folks.  There’s no charge & lunch is included!

    4/8  Princeton Register here
    4/23  Marlinton Register here
    5/12  New Martinsville Register here
    5/20 Oak Hill Register here
    6/13 Charleston Register here
    6/24 Naomi  (tentative)

    3rd Annual Huntington Sustainability Fair

    Come on out for the 3rd Annual Huntington Sustainability Fair!

    10 a.m – 4 p.m. Saturday, May 20
    at The Wild Ramp, 555 14th St W, Huntington, and the Charles Holley Gazebo, across the street. 

    Free family fun! Join the vent on Facebook here and invite others.

    The Huntington Sustainability Fair project is a cooperative effort by Marshall University Sustainability Department, the Wild Ramp, Goodwill Industries of KYOWVA Area, the City of Huntington, OVEC (the Ohio Valley Environmental Coalition), the Old Central City Association, Tour DePATH, and many more.

    PARTICIPANTS WANTED: Area crafts persons, artisans, farmers/growers, organizations, businesses and more are invited to participate in our event. We charge a nominal fee of $20 to set-up a booth. These funds will help us fund this and next year’s event. To participate in our event, visit: www.HuntingtonSustainabilityFair.com.

    VOLUNTEERS: We need you! The community is encouraged to take part. We are in great need of helping hands leading up to and on the day of the fair. If you are interested in volunteering, please visit: www.HuntingtonSustainabilityFair.com.

    We encourage everyone to come learn, listen to live local music, and have fun. There will be a wide variety of participating organizations and groups offering workshops, hands-on demonstrations, and exhibits on sustainable issues. There will also be live music, artisans, and family friendly activities.

    To make a tax deductible donation, please mail your check or money order to the Marshall University Sustainability Department, 1 John Marshall Drive, Huntington WV 25755. Proceeds go to help fund Huntington’s annual Sustainability Fair.

    Join us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/HuntingtonSustainabilityFair.

    Click event title for a venue map

    Official Launch of Ken Hechler Biography

    WVU Press publishes Ken Hechler biography

    • By JAMES E. CASTO For the State Journal
    • Apr 19, 2017

     

    West Virginia University Press has published “The Rebel in the Red Jeep: Ken Hechler’s Life in West Virginia Politics,” a biography written by Carter Taylor Seaton.

    The book follows the personal and professional experiences of Hechler, the West Virginia politician and activist who died in 2016 at the age of 102.

    It recounts his World War II experiences, his work as a speechwriter and researcher for President Harry Truman, his stint as a college professor and his time representing West Virginia in the U.S.House of Representatives and later as West Virginia Secretary of State.

    Traveling the state in his familiar red Jeep, Hechler, a Democrat, was a crusader for coal mine safety and an outspoken foe of mountaintop removal mining. In 2008, a 94-yer-old Hechler was arrested for trespassing during a protest at a mine site.

    Interviewed at a 2014 party celebrating Hechler’s 100th birthday, Seaton said she had been working on the book since 2012 and the more she researched his life, the more appreciation she gained of him.

    “He didn’t kowtow to the political machine,” Seaton said. “He voted his conscience and worked for the important issues for the people of West Virginia.”

    A native of New York, Hechler was educated at Swarthmore College and Columbia University. He served in the Army as a combat historian during World War II. His experiences in Germany became part of one his 10 books, “The Bridge at Remagen,” published in 1957 and made into a motion picture in 1969. After the war, he served in the Truman administration and other positions in Washington.

    In 1957, he moved to Huntington to teach political science at Marshall College. The following year he was a dark horse candidate for Congress. His unexpected victory launched his long political career. He served 18 years in the House, concentrating his efforts on coalmine health and safety issues, protection of the environment and civil rights. Hechler was the only member of Congress to march with Martin Luther King Jr. in 1965 in Selma, Alabama.

    Hechler left Congress in 1976 to unsuccessfully run for governor. Later attempts to regain his seat in Congress failed. In 1984, he was elected West Virginia’s Secretary of State and was re-elected in 1988, 1992 and 1996. In 2010, he ran for the U.S. Senate seat left vacant by the death of Robert C. Byrd but was defeated. Hechler, who was 95 at the time, said he was running to draw attention to the issue of mountaintop removal.

    Carter Taylor Seaton is the author of “Hippie Homesteaders: Arts, Crafts, Music, and Living on the Land in West Virginia,” two novels and numerous magazine articles. A ceramic sculptor, she previously directed a rural craft cooperative and was a marketing professional for 30 years.

    The official launch of her Hechler biography is scheduled for May 20 with an event from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Cabell Huntington Convention and Visitors Bureau.

    https://www.theet.com/statejournal/wvu-press-publishes-ken-hechler-biography/article_fc377779-5b1f-5ca0-8207-1907c0be115a.html

    Click event title for a venue map

    National Academy of Sciences Wants to Hear from You on MTR and Human Health

    In early August of 2016, the Charleston Gazette reported that an “expert team being appointed by the National Academy of Sciences will examine a ‘growing amount of academic research’ that suggests ‘possible correlations’ between increased public health risks for Appalachian residents and living near mountaintop removal coal mining.”

    In an action alert that month we noted: “The committee of experts undertaking this study is to hold four town hall meetings to gather information from folks like us about mountaintop removal’s health impacts. The locations and dates for these meetings have not yet been announced. Stay tuned.”

    Well we now the Charleston, WV date: May 22-24. We will post the location as soon as we have it. You can sign up for updates from the committee here.  Please come out for this meeting and tell the story of mountaintop removal’s impacts on your health!

    Background info here.

    Info from NAS:

    Potential Human Health Effects of Surface Coal Mining Operations in Central Appalachia

    Statement of Task

    An ad hoc committee of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine will conduct a study to examine the potential relationship between increased health risks and living in proximity to sites that have been or are being mined or reclaimed for surface coal deposits. The study will focus on four states in Central Appalachia. In particular, the study will:

    1. Identify and briefly describe the main types of coal deposits in Central Appalachia that are extracted using surface mining techniques. Descriptions will include geologic and geochemical characteristics, mining and reclamation operations, and waste management approaches.
    2. Summarize the state and federal regulatory frameworks for surface coal mining operations, including coal preparation plants and the associated coarse coal refuse facilities and slurry impoundments.
    3. Systematically search and screen literature to identify relevant scientific publications on the potential human health effects related to surface coal mining operations. The committee will use the selected literature to accomplish the following:

    a. Identify effects from surface coal mining operations on air, surface water, ground-water, and drinking water quality and on ecologic communities and soil that could potentially lead to human health concerns.
    b. Evaluate the potential for short-term and long-term human health effects, which will include consideration of potential exposure pathways and relevant environmental contaminants and other stressors.
    c. Assess the scientific and methodologic quality, rigor, and sufficiency of the scientific research.

    4. Identify baseline data and approaches necessary to monitor environmental and human health indicators that may be affected by surface coal mining operations.
    5. Identify gaps in research and needs for additional research that may assist in the development of new approaches to safeguard the health of residents living near these types of coal mining operations.

    As this study is focused on human health effects for those living in close proximity to surface coal mine operations, the committee will not consider the occupational health aspects of workers at these mines.

    Out in the South Gathering: West Virginia

    Register here: https://goo.gl/forms/lMjWYyWNAI0DxShH3

    Join The STAY Project and Appalachian Community Fund for a gathering to bring together the LGBTQIA+ Community in West Virginia. Together, we will create an inter-generational space to celebrate, connect, learn, and share our stories.

    This gathering is designed to expand our networks that support and sustain LGBTQIA+ organizations and individuals in this region.

    For those who cannot attend in person, we will also hold a video conference call on Monda, June 5th at 6pm.

    In late June, a regional gathering will bring participants from Tennessee, Kentucky, Virginia and West Virginia together to hear our findings and plan next steps.

    All gatherings are free and open to the public, including a catered meal (be sure to indicate any dietary restrictions you may have and other access needs when you register). Each gathering will last from 5:30pm-9pm.

    For specific questions, please feel free to contact our Project Director, Kendall Bilbrey, at stayproject@gmail.com.

    Click event title for a venue map

    WV Highlands Conservancy 50th Anniversary Celebration

    Save the dates for WV Highlands Conservancy’s 50th Anniversary Celebration! at Canaan Valley Resort State Park!

    OVEC’s Annual Picnic

    Save the date!

    West Virginia Good Jobs Conference

    West Virginia Good Jobs Conference, taking place Nov. 6-8 at the Tamarack Cultural Center in Beckley.

    – See more at: http://www.wvgazettemail.com/news/20170401/coalfield-development-corporation-launches-pitch-contest#sthash.I1GasokB.dpuf

    Click event title for a venue map

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